Reza afshari essay islamic cultural relativism

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Introduction Current events in Iran provide a disturbing backdrop for ethical reflections by scholars of that country. Today, as the once ferocious script of the Islamist Revolution—that peculiar mixture of anachronism and an outdated third world radicalism—is left with only aging actors and a declining audience, almost everything and everyone is discreetly reverting back to what was most familiar before

Reza afshari essay islamic cultural relativism

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Introduction Current events in Iran provide a disturbing backdrop for ethical reflections by scholars of that country.

Today, as the once ferocious script of the Islamist Revolution—that peculiar mixture of anachronism and an outdated third world radicalism—is left with only aging actors and a declining audience, almost everything and everyone is discreetly reverting back to what was most familiar before The Islamic Revolution was powerful enough to wreak havoc but not powerful enough to change the nature of the modern state or the secular habits of middle-class Iranians.

Order dissertation, - Do my essay paper. The authenticity of our custom essay writing and confidentiality of all information are guaranteed. Asserting that the most serious violations of human rights by state rulers are motivated by political and economic factors rather than the purported concern for cultural authenticity, Afshari examines one particular state that has claimed cultural exception to the universality of . This essay is written in part as a response to this disturbing trend. It has been a practice for the international human rights community to outline ethical guidelines for doctors, nurses, and psychiatrists in relation to human rights violations, especially with respect to children and the victims of torture.

Advocating normalization with the Islamist regime, these academics have begun to extol the virtues of a dialogue with the Islamic Republic. They accept invitations from state-controlled institutions and travel to Iran, often with expenses paid.

In the first ten years of the Islamic Republic, an apologist in Western academia was a rarity. Today, the state has begun to assume a traditional role as magnet for both technobureaucrats and academics. The academics, searching for a rationale for their attraction, offer sociopolitical analyses to justify their legitimation of the clerical regime.

What is perturbing, however, is that this new convergence of priorities and interests again marginalizes considerations of human rights. As under the Shah, they tend to become less than an afterthought. This essay is written in part as a response to this disturbing trend.

It has been a practice for the international human rights community to outline ethical guidelines for doctors, nurses, and psychiatrists in relation to human rights violations, especially with respect to children and the victims of torture.

Many creative artists, novelists, poets, and playwrights also pay close attention to human rights violations around the world. They appreciate the centrality of rights to contemporary sociopolitical realities of countries like Iran or China.

The same cannot be said about many aca-demics in the social sciences and humanities, where there is no clear conception of academic responsibility with regard to human rights abuses. In the National Academy of Sciences established a Committee on Human Rights, but its mandate is limited to situations where scientists around the world fall victim to oppressive governments.

During the s and s, certain governments with notorious human rights records sought service contracts that would engage universities to set up colleges and technical institutes in their respective countries. Some attempts were made to create institutional guidelines for US academia.

The authoritarian Iranian regime rightly assumed that the presence of a university would lend it support. You are not currently authenticated. View freely available titles:Response to Reza Afshari on Islamic Cultural Relativism in - jstor srmvision.comc Cultural Relativism in.

Human Rights srmvision.com Afshari 39;s essay on Islamization, cultural relativism, and human rights, 39; addresses questions that are conceptu- ally intriguing as well as practically ur- gent: (1) whether it is premature to assume the failure of .

Third Generation Rights: What Islamic Law Can Teach the International Human Rights Movement INT’L L. (); Reza Afshari, An Essay on Islamic Cultural Relativism in the Discourse of Human Rights, 16 HUM.

RTS. Q. (). 2. An-Na’im, supra note 1, at 3. Shari'aUnlike Christianity, Islam does not separate religion and politics. Islamic law, or Shari'a, regulates all facets of life of individual Muslims including the personal, family, social, commercial, criminal, political, and religious aspects.

Shari'a consists mainly of family and inheritance law and to a lesser degree contracts law, penal code, taxation . Asserting that the most serious violations of human rights by state rulers are motivated by political and economic factors rather than the purported concern for cultural authenticity, Afshari examines one particular state that has claimed cultural exception to the universality of .

Reza afshari essay islamic cultural relativism

HUMAN RIGHTS IN IRAN: The Abuse of Cultural Relativism, Reza Afshari, University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, , pages, $ Reza Afshari teaches human rights and history at New York's Pace University.

Human Rights in Iran: The Abuse of Cultural Relativism is . Cultural Relativism, 25 VA. J.

Human Rights Quarterly

INT'L L. (); Reza Afshari, An Essay on Islamic Cultural Relativism in the Discourse of Human Rights, 16 HUM. RTS. Q. (). 2. An-Na'im, supra note 1, at 3. DOUGLAS HODGSON, INDIVIDUAL DUTY WITHIN A HUMAN RIGHTS DISCOURSE 41 .

Human Rights in Iran: The Abuse of Cultural Relativism by Reza Afshari